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  • Hair Oil For Locs

    This all natural hair oil is formulated for dreadlocks, sisterlocks, microlocs and can also be used for other natural hairstyles! Avocado Oil Is said to moisturize the scalp which helps reduce dandruff while boosting the shine and elasticity of the hair, and that in turn helps prevent breakage and hair damage. Argan Oil This is definitely one of my favorite oils for both skin and hair and is also referred to as “liquid gold". For hair it is said to fight dandruff, reduce frizz, boost hair growth and soothe the scalp while also adding shine. Coconut Oil The lauric acid in coconut oil is said to help nourish hair and tame frizz so you can maintain a glossy sheen and healthy texture and can also help prevent protein loss. I decided to use regular coconut oil for this recipe instead of fractionated coconut oil because it has little to no lauric acid. Black Castor Oil Is said to stimulate hair growth and strengthen thin hair, preventing hair breakage which is imperative for long locs. Black castor oil is one of the most popular oils for locs (along with regular castor oil) and is often used as a standalone so you can definitely use more than what my recipe calls for. Vitamin E Oil Not only is it said to moisturize and protect the hair from damage but it helps prevent the other oils from going rancid. Peppermint Essential Oil May help increase blood flow to the scalp which positively impacts blood vessels, stimulating hair growth and helping prevent hair loss. Rosemary Essential Oil Can possibly improve circulation, prevent hair loss and stimulate growth. Other great oils to choose from include Jojoba Oil, Sweet Almond Oil, Tea Tree Oil, & Grapeseed oil. Supplies 8.5oz Applicator Bottle Ingredients 104g | 43.4% Avocado Oil 95.8g | 40% Argan Oil 23.9g | 10% Coconut Oil 11.9g | 5% Black Castor Oil 2.4g | 1% Vitamin E Oil 0.9g | 0.4% Peppermint Essential Oil 0.4g | 0.2% Rosemary Essential Oil Directions In a heat safe container melt the coconut oil. I melt it in the microwave in 15 second bursts. Once the coconut oil has cooled (and is still liquified), add all ingredients to your applicator bottle and mix. PDF with mL Measurements

  • Odor Eliminating Wax Melt Recipe

    Supplies Wax melting pitcher/pot or heat safe container Thermometer (2) Snap Bar Clamshells Utensil to mix wax (I use a cocktail spoon) Ingredients 106g Pillar of Bliss Wax 10g Odor Eliminating Fragrance Oil Pink Cornflower (optional) Directions Prepare a water bath by bringing a little less than 1 inch of water to a simmer on medium-low heat in a small pot. Weigh out your wax in a heat safe container/melting pitcher and place the container in the water bath in order to melt the wax. Once your wax reaches 180 degrees Fahrenheit, remove the container from the water bath and mix in the fragrance oil. Once your mixture gets down to 175 degrees Fahrenheit, pour it into your molds, only filling them 3/4s of the way. You will use the remaining wax for your second pour. Let your wax set up in the mold then re-melt the remaining wax to 165 degrees Fahrenheit and pour it in the molds to top off your wax melts. If you would like to add pink cornflower or other decorations, sprinkle them on top of your second pour while it is still in a liquid state. Let your wax melts cool at room temperature then close the clamshell. Notes This recipe makes 2 Snap Bars using the Candlescience molds. If you are using clamshells from a different source, please note that the capacity may differ, as well as the melting temperature of the clamshell (180 degrees for CS molds). If the temperature does differ, please adjust accordingly as the wax may melt the clamshell. If you are using a different wax, please adhere to the melting instructions for that wax. This recipe uses approx. 9% fragrance oil. If you find that this is too strong, you can adjust it to approx. 8% but using 107g wax and 9g fo.

  • Simple Lotion Recipe

    Ingredients Water Phase 77% | 192.5g Distilled Water 6% | 15g Vegetable Glycerin Heated Oil Phase 12% | 30g Apricot Kernel Oil 4% | 10g Emulsifying Wax NF Cool Down Phase 0.5% | 1.25g Liquid Germall Plus 0.5% | 1.25g Fragrance Oil Directions Prepare a water bath by bringing less than 1 inch of water to a simmer on medium-low heat in a sauté pan. In a heat resistant beaker, weigh out the water phase and add it to the water bath. Repeat this in a different beaker with the heated oil phase. After 15-20 minutes in the water bath, your oil phase should be fully melted and you can now remove both beakers from the water bath. Pour water phase into heated oil phase and mix with stick blender for 3-5 minutes. After the lotion mixture has cooled down to at least 122 degrees Fahrenheit, add the cool down phase and mix for another 1-2 minutes. Your mixture will begin to thicken as it cools. Place in an air-tight container. Notes Apricot kernel oil can be substituted with other liquid carrier oils (safflower, grapeseed, sweet almond, etc.) of your choice. Please be aware that different oils may change the feel of final product. Liquid Germall Plus can be swapped for Optiphen at 1.5%.

  • Blackberry Merlot Wine Soap

    If this is your first time making cold process soap, please visit this blog post first: https://www.charmedhandmade.com/post/the-beginner-s-guide-to-making-cold-process-soap-with-recipe Recipe Mold Size - 65 oz Extra Skinny Soap Mold Preparing Wine In order to prepare your wine for soap-making, you will need to pour it into a sauce pan and let it simmer for 20-30 on low to medium heat. This step is necessary because lye and alcohol do not mix well so we let it simmer in order to reduce most of the alcohol. Although I only used 6 oz of wine in this recipe, I did simmer the entire bottle for later use. If you do not want to use the full bottle, you should use at least 12 oz of wine because during the simmering process, the wine will be reduced. After simmering, let your wine cool then pour it into ice trays and let it freeze. I used silicone ice trays for easy removal. Preparing Colorant To disperse your mica easily, I recommend mixing it with a liquid carrier oil like sweet almond oil or olive oil, using 3 parts oil and 1 part mica. Since I used 1 tsp of mica for this soap, I mixed it with 1 tbsp of olive oil in a small container. To get my desired color, I mixed 3 different micas together, including: 1/2 tsp Flashdance, 1/4 tsp I Dream of Purple, 1/4 tsp Ballet Slippers. These micas all came from madmicas.com. Ingredients 6.38 oz - Sodium Hydroxide (Lye) 6.96 oz - Distilled Water 6 oz - Prepped Wine 26.22 oz | 57% - Olive Oil 11.5 oz | 25% - Coconut Oil 4.6 oz | 10% - Shea Butter 3.68 oz | 8% - Castor Oil 2.01 oz - Fragrance Oil 1 tsp - Purplish-Pink Mica Directions Gather your supplies. Put on your gloves, safety glasses, and long sleeves. Be sure to be in a well-ventilated area free of pets, children, or those that need supervision. Measure out the required amount of lye into a lye safe container. Into a different lye safe container, measure out the frozen wine cubes and distilled water. The total amount of liquid should be 12.96 oz. Slowly pour a small amount of lye into the liquid mixture and stir. Repeat this until your lye is fully dissolved in the water/wine mixture. Set aside to cool. In a heat-resistant bowl, measure and melt shea butter and coconut oil. After your shea butter and coconut oil are liquified, pour olive oil and castor oil into that same heat-resistant bowl. Also, measure out your fragrance oil in a separate container and set aside. Once your oil mixture and your lye solution are both in the 70 - 75 degrees Fahrenheit range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils and mix with a stick blender until it has formed an emulsion (can no longer be separated). This typically takes just a few seconds. Add fragrance oil and disbursed mica to the batter and mix by hand with a silicone spatula or other mixing utensil. After the mica and fragrance oil have been stirred in, mix again with the stick blender until medium to thick trace is achieved. Pour the soap mixture into the mold evenly. To add texture to the top of the soap, you can massage soap with a chopstick creating wave-like peaks and divots. Be sure to remove any air pockets by tapping the mold gently on a hard surface. Spray 99% isopropyl alcohol on top of the soap in order to help prevent soda ash. This step is optional. Let your soap sit in the mold for 24 to 48 hours then unmold and cut into 1 inch bars. Allow your soap to cure for 4-6 weeks on a drying rack or wax paper in a cool, well-ventilated area away from direct sunlight. Notes The liquid portion of your lye solution can be up to 100% wine. Using half distilled water and half wine is just my personal preference. If you are okay with brown/tan soap, the mica can be omitted. Download the SoapCalc recipe here

  • Grinchy Shower Steamer

    Ingredients 155g Baking Soda 85g Citric Acid 10g Kaolin Clay 1 tbsp Sweet Almond Oil 2/3 tsp Witch Hazel 2mL  Fragrance Oil 1/4  tsp Mica (I used 1/16 tsp Lounge Lizard Mica & 3/16 tsp 3 Olive Martini Mica) Directions In a large bowl, combine baking soda, citric acid, and kaolin clay. Mix ingredients thoroughly. Be sure to break down any clumps. I find it easiest to sift the ingredients. After the dry ingredients are thoroughly mixed, add in sweet almond oil and fragrance oil and mix with whisk or by hand. In the same bowl, slowly pour in witch hazel and mix with whisk while pouring. The mixture will begin to slowly bubble/activate but mixing while pouring will minimize this. Add mica to the mixture and mix until it can be firmly squeezed and hold together. Pack the mixture into the mold. If your shower steamer mixture starts to dry out, spray witch hazel and mix. Let the shower steamer sit in mold for 24-48 hours then remove. In order to create paint for the shower steamer, mix a few drops of 91% isopropyl alcohol with a pinch of mica and stir until smooth and paint on with a thin paint brush. Please see the link section down below for all micas used. Notes Sweet almond oil can be substituted for grapeseed oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, or your favorite liquid carrier oil. Shower steamers are best packaged in shrink wrap or stored in an airtight container. To use a shower steamer, break off a piece and place it out of direct stream of water but where it can occasionally get wet. Can also be placed on a shower shelf. This recipe makes 1 Grinch shower steamer Links Grinch Mold - https://amzn.to/41z9B59 Witch Hazel - https://amzn.to/3v01PVW Fragrance Oil - https://www.wholesalesuppliesplus.com/products/grinch-mas-crunch-fragrance-oil-20051.aspx Lounge Lizard Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/lounge-lizard-mica?_pos=1&_sid=2f1a53cd0&_ss=r 3 Olive Martini Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/3-olive-martini-mica?_pos=1&_sid=266a72753&_ss=r Lemon Cupcake Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/lemon-cupcake-mica?_pos=6&_sid=35d93c59f&_ss=r Black Oyster - https://www.madmicas.com/products/black-oyster-mica?_pos=1&_sid=300d5b2c7&_ss=r Titanium Dioxide - https://www.madmicas.com/products/titanium-dioxide?_pos=1&_psq=titan&_ss=e&_v=1.0 True Red Blend - https://www.madmicas.com/products/true-red-blend?_pos=1&_psq=true&_ss=e&_v=1.0

  • Gingerbread Man Bath Bombs

    Ingredients 280g Baking Soda 145g Citric Acid 40g Epsom Salt 10g Kaolin Clay 2.5 tsp Sunflower Oil 1 tsp Witch Hazel 0.25 tsp Fragrance Oil 0.25 tsp Polysorbate 80 ½ tsp - 1 tsp of Mica Directions In a large bowl, combine baking soda, citric acid, epsom salt, and kaolin clay. Mix ingredients thoroughly. Be sure to break down any clumps. I find it easiest to sift the ingredients. After the dry ingredients are thoroughly mixed, add in sunflower oil, fragrance oil, and polysorbate 80 and mix with whisk or by hand. In the same bowl, slowly pour in witch hazel and mix with whisk while pouring. The mixture will begin to slowly bubble/activate but mixing while pouring will minimize this. Add mica to the mixture and mix until it can be firmly squeezed and hold together. Pack the mixture into the mold. If your bath bomb mixture starts to dry out, spray witch hazel and mix. Let bath bombs sit in mold for 24-48 hours then remove. In order to create paint for the bath bombs, mix a few drops of 91% isopropyl alcohol with a pinch of mica and stir until smooth and paint on with a thin paint brush. Please see the link section down below for all micas used. Notes Sunflower oil can be substituted for grapeseed oil, sweet almond oil, safflower oil, or your favorite liquid carrier oil. Bath bombs are best packaged in shrink wrap or stored in an airtight container. In this recipe, polysorbate 80 is used to help prevent mica from forming a color ring around the tub. To use bath bombs, add one to warm bath water and enjoy! I used a mixture of these micas from Mad Micas to create the color for these bath bombs: Koi, King Tut, and Sexy Stranger On A Train Brown Mica. This recipe makes 4 gingerbread man bath bombs. Links Gingerbread Man Mold - https://amzn.to/3GHqjFX Witch Hazel - https://amzn.to/3v01PVW Fragrance Oil - https://www.naturesgardencandles.com/fragrance-oils/gingerbread-fragrance-oil Polysorbate 80 - https://amzn.to/3RES4Fw Koi Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/koi-orange-mica?_pos=1&_sid=9cab08b0b&_ss=r&variant=42403421782234 King Tut Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/king-tut-gold-mica?_pos=1&_sid=5755020b9&_ss=r Sexy Stranger On A Train Brown Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/sexy-stranger-on-a-train-mica?_pos=1&_sid=d6f05a783&_ss=r Titanium Dioxide - https://www.madmicas.com/products/titanium-dioxide?_pos=1&_psq=titan&_ss=e&_v=1.0 Heliotrope Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/heliotrope-purple-mica?_pos=1&_psq=heliotrop&_ss=e&_v=1.0 Blue Tide Mica - https://www.madmicas.com/products/blue-tide-mica?_pos=1&_psq=blue+tide&_ss=e&_v=1.0 True Red Blend - https://www.madmicas.com/products/true-red-blend?_pos=1&_psq=true&_ss=e&_v=1.0

  • Vanilla Brown Sugar Body Scrub

    Ingredients 45g Granulated Sugar 35g Light Brown Sugar 18g Sweet Almond Oil 0.1g Fragrance Oil (I used this) 2g Vitamin E Oil (optional) Directions Combine granulated sugar and brown sugar in a medium sized bowl and break down any clumps. Add sweet almond oil, fragrance oil, and vitamin E oil into the bowl containing the sugars and mix thoroughly. Store sugar scrub in an airtight container in a cool, dry space. Notes Sweet almond oil can be substituted with another liquid carrier oil of your choice.

  • Lavender Double Whipped Body Butter

    Ingredients 120g | 60% Shea Butter 42g | 21% Grapeseed Oil 22g | 11% Sunflower Oil 10g | 5% Evening Primrose Oil 2g | 1% Fragrance Oil (I used this) 2g | 1% Vitamin E 2g | 1% Kaolin Clay (optional) Directions Melt Shea butter by measuring it out into a beaker or melting pot and put it in a water bath containing 1 inch of simmering water. You can also use a double boiler or add the Shea butter to a heat safe bowl and place the bowl over a pot of simmering water. While the butter is melting, add grapeseed oil, evening primrose oil, and sunflower oil to a separate medium size bowl/container. Once the butter has melted, pour it into the container holding the oils and stir. Let mixture harden in the refrigerator for approx. 1 hour or until the mixture is semi-solid. Remove the container from the refrigerator and add fragrance oil, kaolin clay and vitamin E. Mix with hand-mixer on high for 4-6 minutes. To double whip, let mixture harden at room temperature or pop in the fridge for 5 minutes then whip for another 2-3 minutes. Store your whipped body butter in an air tight jar. Notes Grapeseed oil, evening primrose oil and sunflower oil can be substituted for the liquid carrier oils of your choice. Please be aware that this may change the consistency and feel of the body butter. Kaolin clay has been added to help down on the greasiness but can be omitted. Arrowroot powder can also be used for this purpose. Essential oils can be used in place of fragrance oil but please check the manufacturer usage rates.

  • Grapefruit Bellini Cold Process Soap

    This cold process soap was created as a colorant experiment with mica. I wanted to create a gradient from pink to white using only 1 pink mica and this is how my experiment turned out! Gather Your Materials First, you’ll need to gather all the necessary items for your soap-making project. You will need a digital scale, a soap mold, a stick blender, a thermometer, and lye safe mixing bowls and utensils. You will also need to gather your ingredients, including lye, distilled water, oils and butters (sunflower oil, castor oil, olive oil, coconut oil, and mango butter), pink mica, and fragrance oil. Make sure to use proper protective gear like goggles and gloves when handling lye. Please check out our article on lye safety or watch this video before making your first batch of soap. Mix Your Lye Solution The next step is mixing your lye solution. Using a lye safe container, measure out your lye using a digital scale. Next, measure out the distilled water in a separate lye safe container. Once both are measured out, carefully pour lye crystals into the distilled water—never add water to lye! Add the lye crystals slowly while stirring continuously until all the lye has dissolved into the water. Once again, be sure to wear safety goggles, gloves and clothing that covers your arms and legs, as lye is caustic and can cause serious burns when handled improperly. Additionally, always mix your lye solution in a well ventilated area free of pets, children, or those that need supervision. Measure Out Your Oils & Butters While the lye solution cools, in a separate heat-safe container, measure out your solid oils and butters, in this case, the coconut oil and mango butter. Heat this mixture until the solid ingredients are fully melted. After they are fully melted, measure your remaining oils into the same container. In a separate small container, measure out your fragrance oil and set it aside. Colorant Prep Set out 4 containers for your layers. In one container add 1/2 tsp of mica. In the second container add 1/4 tsp of mica. In the third container, add 1/8 tsp of mica. To the fourth container mix 1/8 tsp of titanium dioxide and a small amount of water, this will be your white layer. In order to disperse the mica easier, you can mix a small amount of lightweight oil in each container with mica. Create Your Soap Mixture Once your oil mixture and your lye solution are both in the 80-85 degrees Fahrenheit range, it’s time to make soap! Start by slowly pouring your cooled off lye solution into your oils and mix with a stick blender/immersion blender, making sure to avoid introducing air bubbles. Blend for about 20 seconds or until the oil and lye solution are mixed together then add fragrance oil. Begin mixing again and keep blending until the mixture reaches a thin trace. After soap mixture is blended, split batter between 4 containers evenly then stick blend from the lightest color to the darkest until each color is fully mixed. Pour the Mixture into the Mold Pour the darkest soap mixture into the mold evenly and add texture by massaging with a spoon. Repeat this with each layer going from darkest to lightest. Be sure to remove any air pockets by tapping the mold gently on a hard surface. Add texture to the top of the soap by gently scraping small spoon about 3/4 of the way width wise repeatedly down the soap. Add pink cornflower to the side of the soap that has not be texturized. Cover the mold with the lid or cardboard to insulate the soap, allowing it to set for 24-48 hours. Cut and Cure the Soap Once the soap has set, remove the soap from the mold and cut it into bars with a knife or a soap cutter. Then, place the bars onto a drying rack and let them cure for 4-6 weeks. During the curing process, the soap will harden, and the chemical reactions will complete, making it safe to use. Recipe Mold Size 65 oz Extra Skinny Soap Mold Ingredients 6.5 oz - Sodium Hydroxide (Lye) 13.21 oz - Distilled Water 20.7 oz - Olive Oil 13.34 oz - Coconut Oil 4.6 oz - Mango Butter 4.14 oz - Sunflower Oil 3.22 oz Castor Oil 2.01 oz - Fragrance Oil Pink Mica Titanium Dioxide Pink Cornflower Petals (for decoration) Directions Gather your supplies. Put on your gloves, safety glasses, and long sleeves. Be sure to be in a well-ventilated area free of pets, children, or those that need supervision. Measure out the required amount of lye into a lye safe container. Measure out the required amount of water into a separate lye safe container. Slowly pour the lye into the water and stir. Set aside to cool. In a heat-resistant bowl, measure and melt mango butter and coconut oil. After your mango butter and coconut oil are liquified, measure olive oil, sunflower oil and castor oil into same heat-resistant bowl. Also, measure out your fragrance oil in a separate container and set aside. Set out 4 containers for your layers. In one container add 1/2 tsp of mica. In the second container add 1/4 tsp of mica. In the third container, add 1/8 tsp of mica. To the fourth container mix 1/8 tsp of titanium dioxide and a small amount of water. In order to disperse the mica easier, you can mix a small amount of lightweight oil in each container with the pink mica. Once your oil mixture and your lye solution are both in the 80 - 85 degrees Fahrenheit range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils and mix with a stick blender until it has formed an emulsion (can no longer be separated). This typically takes just a few seconds. Add fragrance oil and mix with a stick blender until you get to a thin trace. Separate batter into each of the 4 containers evenly. Stick blend from the lightest color to the darkest until you reach medium trace. Hand mixing each with a spatula for a few seconds first will help the colorant get more dispersed without speeding up trace. Pour the darkest soap mixture into the mold evenly and add texture by massaging soap with a spoon creating peaks and divots. Repeat this with each layer. Be sure to remove any air pockets by tapping the mold gently on a hard surface. Add texture to the top of the soap by gently scraping small spoon about 3/4 of the way width wise repeatedly down the soap. Add pink cornflower to the side of the soap that has not be texturized. Spray 99% isopropyl alcohol on top of the soap in order to help prevent soda ash. This step is optional. Let your soap sit in the mold for 24 to 48 hours then unmold and cut into 1 inch bars. Allow your soap to cure for 4-6 weeks on a drying rack or wax paper in a cool, well-ventilated area away from direct sunlight. Download the SoapCalc recipe here

  • Citrus Bath Salt Bag

    Ingredients 1 cup Epsom Salt 1 tbsp Dendritic Salt 4 drops Sweet Orange Essential Oil 2 drops Lemon Essential Oil 4 drops Grapefruit Essential Oil 10 drops Fractionated Coconut Oil Dried Jasmine Flowers Dried Calendula Dried Orange Slices Directions In a small mixing bowl, combine dendritic salt and oils. Mix. To the same bowl, add Epsom salt and desired amount of jasmine flowers and calendula. Mix. Add salt mixture to a sealable bag and top with a dried orange slice. Notes Dendritic salt is used to absorb the oils in this recipe without creating clumps. If you would like to omit it, I recommend letting your mixture dry over night before packaging it. Epsom salt can be swapped for Dead Sea salt. In order to prevent your drain from clogging, I recommend adding salt to a mesh bag like this one. The fractionated coconut oil can be substituted for another carrier oil such as sweet almond oil, sunflower oil, etc.

  • Simple Emulsified Body Butter

    Ingredients Water Phase 50% | 75g Water 7% | 10.5g Vegetable Glycerin Heated Oil Phase 5% | 7.5g Jojoba Oil 9% | 13.5g Shea Butter 14% | 21g Sweet Almond Oil 3% | 4.5g Stearic Acid 10% | 15g Emulsifying Wax NF Cool Down Phase 1.5% | 2.25g Optiphen 0.5% | .75g Fragrance Oil Directions Prepare a water bath by bringing 1 inch of water to a simmer on medium-low heat in a sauté pan. In a heat resistant beaker, weigh out the water phase and add it to the water bath. Repeat this in a different beaker with the heated oil phase. After 20 minutes in the water bath, your oil phase should be fully melted and you can now remove both beakers from the water bath. Due to evaporation, your water phase will have lost a few grams, so you will need to add that back by putting your heated oil phase beaker on the scale, taring/clearing the scale, then pouring the water phase into the oil phase. The total amount of the water phase should be 85.5g, if this is not the case, pour hot distilled water into your mixture to bring it to 85.5g. Mix with milk frother or milk forther attachment for 1-2 minutes. Let your body butter cool for about 10 minutes or until the temperature is under 140 degrees Fahrenheit then add optiphen and fragrance. The most precise way that I have found to do this without wasting ingredients is to use pipettes. Your butter will begin to thicken as it cools. I typically scoop mine into a wide mouth jar about 2-4 hours after I have finished making it.

  • Coloring Cold Process Soap with Clay

    I absolutely love adding color to my soaps and recently I've been getting into using natural colorants such as purees, powders, and clays. I decided that I wanted to test a few different clay colorants but of course that got expanded to almost every clay I could find. For this experiment I tested rose clay, kaolin clay, red Moroccan clay, French green clay, bentonite, purple Brazilian clay, dead sea clay powder and rhassoul clay. The soap recipe included 67% olive oil, 25% coconut oil, and 8% castor oil with 5% superfat. Although olive oil and other oils/butters naturally change the color of my soap, I was more focused on not having fragrance oil play any part in the color so there was no fragrance added. After mixing my soap, I first poured my "control" soap so that I would know what the soap would look like with no additives. For these bars, I settled on 1 tsp of colorant per pound of soap and to make them disperse easier, I mixed together 1 tablespoon of distilled water with each teaspoon of clay. The only clay that came out clumpy with the distilled water was bentonite so I mixed it with 1 tbsp. of isopropyl alcohol instead. Once all of the soaps were poured, I let them sit uncovered in the mold for 48 hours then waited the full 6 weeks of curing time to see what the final colors would be and here are my results: In conclusion, I am super happy with how these soaps came out but I really love the dead sea clay, rose clay and purple Brazilian clay. Note: You can also achieve different hues of the colors shown by simply adding more or adding less clay.

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